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Story Told About Acuff

Roy Claxton Acuff was born September 15, 1903, in Maynardville, Tennessee. The Acuffs are an old and proud family that traces its roots back to French soldiers who accompanied William the Conqueror of Normandy on his 1066 invasion of England and then participated in the Crusades of the 12th and 13th centuries. Roy Acuff's parental grandfather, Corum Acuff, was a Union soldier during the Civil War who later had a distinguished career in the Tennessee General Assembly. Roy's father, Neil Acuff, was a lawyer and postmaster who was ordained as a minister and became the pastor of the local Maynardville Baptist Church; Roy's mother, Ida Carr, was a homemaker.

Acuff's father was a skilled fiddle player, and as a child Roy Acuff played the mouth harp and the harmonica and sang in the church choir. Although he was not an especially talented or passionate musician as a boy, Acuff nevertheless insisted that music–his father's fiddle playing in particular–made a lasting impress…

Mentally an Actuarian

I work as an actuarial consultant, so my days vary greatly. In the past several months, I've traveled to New Jersey, Indianapolis, Las Vegas and London, and I have trips coming up to Hartford and New York. On those days, I'm typically working for a specific client at their office or visiting some of my colleagues in other Deloitte offices.

Today, I'm working in my office in Chicago. So far today, I've researched the applicable accounting rules and written a report for a client who's acquiring a small life insurance company; provided guidance over the phone to a colleague regarding the audit of an insurance company; attended an in-house training session on the modeling of life insurance reserves; worked on a spreadsheet model to do financial projections for a client; and worked on developing some materials for a committee on which I serve. All of those activities are representative of the various facets of my job—research, written communications, verbal communication…

Actualism of Extraterrestrial

Actualism is a widely-held view in the metaphysics of modality. To understand the thesis of actualism, consider the following example. Imagine a race of beings — call them ‘Aliens’ — that is very different from any life-form that exists anywhere in the universe; different enough, in fact, that no actually existing thing could have been an Alien, any more than a given gorilla could have been a fruitfly. Now, even though there are no Aliens, it seems intuitively the case that there could have been such things. After all, life might have evolved very differently than the way it did in fact. For example, if the fundamental physical constants or the laws of evolution had been slightly different, very different kinds of things might have existed. So in virtue of what is it true that there could have been Aliens when in fact there are none, and when, moreover, nothing that exists in fact could have been an Alien?

To answer this question, a philosopher should try to identify the special featur…

THE FACTS OF ACTS OF THE APOSTLES

The theme of God's visitation and universal offer of salvation through Christ is first expressed in the Gospel of Luke through Zechariah, and Simeon when he saw the Child Jesus in the Temple, "a light for revelation to the Gentiles and glory. The traditional promise of a Savior for all of humanity is fulfilled in Christ, who desires salvation and all Gentiles. There is a narrative unity to Luke and Acts, for the mission of Jesus in Luke and his disciples in Acts is to carry out the "Purpose of God," a concept expressed in Luke which tells the people of Capernaum that "I must preach the good news of the kingdom of God to the other cities also, for I was sent for this purpose". Luke's Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles are key to the description of the history and mission of the early Church. The Apostles are guided throughout Acts by the risen Christ and the Holy Spirit to carry out God's Plan. The Acts of the Apostles is an exciting narrative and …

Origin of Actoridae

Eurytus and Cteatus, the sons of Actor (whence they were also called Actoridae) or else of Poseidon and Molione. As boys they fought against Nestor and the men of Pylus. When they had grown up, they beat the army of Heracles that threatened their uncle Augeas, but were killed by the former near Cleonae in Argolis. In Homer their sons Thalpius and Antimachus are the chieftains of the Epeians before Troy. A later legend describes them as having only one body.
MOLIONES or MOLIONIDAE (Molionidai), a patronymic name by which Eurytus and Cteatus, the sons of Actor, or Poseidon, by Molione, are orten designated. They were nephews of Augeas, king of the Epeians. As sons of Actor, they are also called Actoridae, or AktoriĆ“ne. According to a late tradition, they were born out of an egg; and it is further stated, that the two brothers were grown together, so that they had only one body, but two heads, four arms, and four legs. Homer mentions none of these extraordinary circumstances; and, accordi…

The Early Acton

The name Acton means Oak Town and is an Anglo-Saxon name, suggesting that there was a settlement at Acton in Saxon times. Most of the settlement in the Middle Ages lay along the Uxbridge Road and close to the parish church of St. Mary's. There were several inns here.

In the early days, Acton was popular with the gentry and minor courtiers as a summer residence. Acton Wells was reputed to possess health giving mineral water. The first known stagecoach to make journeys from Acton to London was The Acton Machine, there were horse trams, and electric trams ran the length of the Uxbridge Road. Motorbuses were seen.

Acton's first railway station was Acton Central, opening in 1853. This was on the North and South Western Junction line. Although the Great Western Railway ran through Acton from 1838, Acton main line station did not open until 1868. At this time, 38 trains travelled each way through Acton per day. There was also the Birmingham branch line of the GWR, which stopped at Old …

Historical Battle of Actium

At the Battle of Actium, off the western coast of Greece, Roman leader Octavian wins a decisive victory against the forces of Roman Mark Antony and Cleopatra, queen of Egypt. Before their forces suffered final defeat, Antony and Cleopatra broke though the enemy lines and fled to Egypt, where they would commit suicide the following year.

With the assassination of Roman dictator Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Rome fell into civil war. To end the fighting, a coalition–the Second Triumvirate–was formed by three of the strongest belligerents. The triumvirate was made up of Octavian, Caesar’s great-nephew and chosen heir; Mark Antony, a powerful general; and Lepidus, a Roman statesman. The empire was divided among the three, and Antony took up the administration of the eastern provinces. Upon arriving in Asia Minor, he summoned Queen Cleopatra to answer charges that she had aided his enemies. Cleopatra, ruler of Egypt since 51 B.C., had once been Julius Caesar’s lover and had borne him a child, w…