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Showing posts from January, 2018

The Ahimelech

Ahimelech was a high priest at Nob, just east of Jerusalem. David fleeing from King Saul, who was trying to kill him, requested bread and a weapon from Ahimelech. Ahimelech gave David the holy bread from the sanctuary along with the sword of Goliath that was hidden there. Doeg, who was a henchman of Saul, was in the area that day and saw this event. He reported it to Saul. Saul became enraged that Ahimelech conspired against him in helping David. Saul had Doeg execute all 85 priests at Nob, including Ahimelech. Abiathar, Ahimelech's son, was the only one to escaped.

In these older sources Zodak first appears in David's reign, after Israel and Judah were united under him, as joint occupant with Ahimelech of the high priest's office and his name taking precedence of that of his colleague Ahimelech, the son of Abiathar. On David's flight from Jerusalem, occasioned by Absalom's rebellion, Zadok and Abiathar (now the joint high priest), accompanied by the whole body of t…

Life of An Achimaas

Now after these things Absalom made himself chariots, and horsemen, and fifty men to run before him. And Absalom rising up early stood by the entrance of the gate, and when any man had business to come to the king's judgment, Absalom called him to him, and said: Of what city are you? He answered, and said: your servant is of such a tribe of Israel. And Absalom answered him: your words seem to me good and just. But there is no man appointed by the king to hear you. And Absalom said: they would make me judge over the land, that all that have business might come to me, that I might do them justice. Moreover when any man came to him to salute him, he put forth his hand, and took him, and kissed him. And this he did to all Israel that came for judgment, to be heard by the king, and he enticed the hearts of the men of Israel. And after forty years, Absalom said to king David: Let me go, and pay my vows which I have vowed to the Lord in Hebron. For your servant made avow, when he was in …

The Ancient Dark Past of Achill

Achill has a history of human settlement that is at least 5,000 years old. The remains of megalithic tombs and monuments suggest settlement by Neolithic man in the 3rd or 4th centuries BC. These people significantly changed the landscape of the area, which at the time was heavily forested. Neolithic culture brought farming to Achill, requiring the clearing of forest for cereal crops, and walled fields for livestock. It is estimated that at the end of the Neolithic period, Achill had a population of 500-1000 people.


Evidence of Bronze Age settlement on Achill includes hut platforms and associated field systems and enclosures in the area of Slievemore. The remains of several promontory forts along the coast show that settlement expanded across Achill Island in the Iron Age (c. 400BC). It is thought that many Ulster families sought refuge in Achill, and the prevalance of Ulster surnames in modern Achill supports this. Names such as Gallagher, O’Donnell, Corrigan, Cafferkey and Mulloy are …

Foulds Discover The Old Acheulian

As archaeologists quickly noticed, one of the hand axes is particularly heavy, weighing over 3.5 kilograms which is almost 8 lbs. Judging from the tool’s design, archaeologists concluded that several of the artifacts are "Acheulian." The term Acheulian, also known Acheulean and Mode II, describes an archaeological industry of stone tool manufacture characterized by oval and pear-shaped "hand-axes" tightly linked with early humans. Acheulian tools were created during the Lower Palaeolithic era across Africa and much of West Asia, South Asia, and Europe, and are usually found with Homo erectus remains. It is thought that Acheulian technologies first developed in Africa out of the more primitive Oldowan technology as long as 1.76 million years ago, by Homo habilis. Acheulian tools were the dominant technology for the vast majority of human history.

For the time being, however, archaeologists can’t be absolutely certain about the exact period the newly found artifacts a…

Mythical Acheron

The river first looked upon in this light was the Acheron in Thesprotia, in Epirus, a country which appeared to the earliest Greeks as the end of the world in the west, and the locality of the river led them to the belief that it was the entrance into the lower world. When subsequently Epirus and the countries beyond the sea became better known, the Acheron or the entrance to the lower world was transferred to other more distant parts, and at last the Acheron was placed in the lower world itself. Thus we find in the Homeric poemsthe Acheron described as a river of Hades, into which the Phlegethon and Cocytus are said to flow. Virgil describes it as the principal river of Tartarus, from which the Styx and Cocytus sprang. According to later traditions, Acheron had been a son of Helios and Gaea or Demeter, and was changed into the river bearing his name in the lower world, because he had refreshed the Titans with drink during their contest with Zeus. They further state that Ascalaphus was…