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Showing posts from May, 2018

He Gets to Ten More Years From Acleistocardia

Brook was a 24-year-old man. He had acleistocardia which means a failure of the foramen ovale of the heart to close. Transthoracic echocardiography and multiple-detector computed tomography showed that the aortic valve was pentacuspid, which consisted of three relatively equal cusps and two larger or smaller cusps. Color Doppler showed severe aortic regurgitation and mild regurgitation due to left ventricular enlargement. Based on Brook's case which is rare, the doctor may cautiously conclude that the sizes of cusps vary among deformed pentacuspid aortic valves. One cusp may or may not coaptate with the other four cusps, and if they can not coaptate well then aortic regurgitation will occur and progress, which finally requires aortic valve replacement. The pentacuspid artic valve is an extremely rare form of congenital heart malformation. It may be accompanied with other malformations, such as acleistocardia, coronary–pulmonary artery fistula, and prolapse of mitral valve. In some…

Darkness in Ackton

Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority; still more when you super add the tendency of the certainty of corruption by authority. Despotic power is always accompanied by corruption of morality. Authority that does not exist for Liberty is not authority but force. Everybody likes to get as much power as circumstances allow, and nobody will vote for a self-denying ordinance. Absolute power demoralizes. 
When a person gains power over other persons–political power to force other persons to do his bidding when they do not believe it right to do so–it seems inevitable that a moral weakness develops in the person who exercises that power. It may take time for this weakness to become visible. In fact, its full extent is frequently left to the historians to record, but we eventually learn of it. It was Lord Acton, the British historian, who said: “All power tends to corrupt; absolute …

The Act Of Acknowledgement

More often than not, people don’t—or won’t—acknowledge you for your contributions and accomplishments. Which may seem a little strange since almost all of us harbor hopes for such recognition—one reason, perhaps, that the expression “fishing for compliments” is so well-known. But though it might seem intuitive that people would be more than willing to give what they’d greatly appreciate getting themselves, this typically isn't the case. In one way or another, virtually everybody dreams of standing out, being admired, acclaimed—even, well, applauded. To be viewed, and to view ourselves, as merely “average” or “adequate” really doesn't do very much for us—or rather, our ego. And this may be all the more so because we live in a meritorious, American-Idol-type society that refuses to celebrate or lavish praise on individuals unless they’re judged exceptional. This circumstance explains why we may experience a certain envy when we hear drums banging for someone else. Secretly, we l…

Acis' Tragic Love

Once upon a time, long ago, on the rocky coast of Sicily lived a Cyclops named Polyphemus. Son of the sea god Poseidon, he was a monstrous creature. In the center of his giant forehead was one great eye, but that was not the worst of his traits. He was a hairy brute, and his manner was even rougher than his looks. No men and no gods chose to keep his company, and so his loneliness and fury increased.

And then one day something astonishing happened. Polyphemus caught sight of the lovely sea nymph Galatea, and the moment he saw her, he fell madly in love. His love was as passionate and huge as was his fury and beastliness. From that day on, he became consumed with seeking the love of the nymph. But Galatea's heart belonged to another, a handsome young shepherd called Acis, son of Pan. He was a sweet and humble young man, loved by his father and mother, by his flocks and by all who knew him. But no one loved him as deeply as did Galatea. And as much as Galatea loved this youth, she ha…

The Acinar Redeemer

Acinar cell neoplasms arise from the acinar cells of the pancreas. Normal acinar cells are the primary cells of the exocrine pancreas and are responsible for secreting various enzymes. These tumors are distinct from the more common adenocarcinomas of the pancreatic ducts. Because the tumors arise from normal acinar cells, the tumor cells also may secrete pancreatic enzymes, most commonly lipase. This is a rare cancer. Jenny was one of the patients who suffered from abdominal or back pain, and no lipase hypersecretion syndrome. She had to be resected cases to increase her survivability. However, it could only extend up to 5 years at most. Jenny presenting with low grade fever and mid-abdominal tenderness secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation metastatic to the liver. She received multiple lines of conventional and investigational chemotherapy regimens. This included cycles of gemcitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, docetaxel, capecitabine, octreotide, le…

Killed By Acidulated Water and Over Consuming

Acidulated water is water where some sort of acid is added—often lemon juice, lime juice, or vinegar—to prevent cut or skinned fruits or vegetables from browning so as to maintain their appearance. Making up about 66 percent of the human body, water runs through the blood, inhabits the cells, and lurks in the spaces between. At every moment water escapes the body through sweat, urination, defecation or exhaled breath, among other routes. Replacing these lost stores is essential but rehydration can be overdone. There is such a thing as a fatal water overdose. Mary died after competing in a radio station's on-air water-drinking contest. After downing some six liters of water, she begin to vomit then went home with a splitting headache, and died from so-called water intoxication. A group of teenagers have died after consuming copious amounts of water trying to rehydrate following long nights of dancing and sweating. Too much of something is never a good thing.

Acidification of Chinchorro

Having survived 8,000 years, the Chinchorro found in modern-day Chile and Peru have started decaying more quickly than ever before. Sometimes even melting into gelatinous The Chinchorro , the oldest manmade ones in the world, originate with the Chinchorro people, who preserved their dead by filling the bodies with fiber and straw. Unlike the Egyptians, the Chinchorro mummified all of their dead. Hundreds of these mummies are still buried in Chilean valleys, where they are often uncovered by construction. However, upon the scavenge, hundred of people died of inhaling poison gas emitted from the Chinchorro. The decaying problem began with them that should be been kept most safe inside of a sacred tomb untouched. The survivors noticed the decay accelerating over the past decade. So they decided to bring in scientists who determined that the cause was bacteria. But they had survived thousands of years already. Why did bacteria suddenly take a liking to them now?

The ideal humidity for the …