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Showing posts from April, 2018

Luke's Struggles With Acidemia

Luke was born on Wednesday and they were sent home. Within hours of having him home, they became concerned with his lack of interest in eating, irregular breathing patterns and overall lack of response to stimulation. On Saturday, they took him to the walk-in to see a pediatrician who immediately arranged for an ambulance to take him to the hospital in Madison. Almost simultaneously, his newborn screen came back indicating that he had some type of metabolic disorder. Things were happening extremely fast. Before transferring him to the American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH), Luke was baptized and many prayers were shared. Upon arrival, Luke was put on dialysis and many intrusive lines were placed. His ammonia level was abnormal, had uncontrolled hypotension, seizures, respiratory hypertension…it was overwhelming to say the least.

"He was struggling so hard to breathe, his ribcage was visible with each breath,” Janet recalls. “You would pick him up and his arms would just fl…

Foundations Built From Acid Reflux Patient

She's not going to live long. At most, 4-5 years. Doctor ask for us to prepare for anything bad to happen at anytime. No one could take in such a news and live happily the next day. She had a very chronic acid reflux. Doctor said she had acid bubbling up from the stomach into the esophagus, a condition called gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The most serious consequence of chronic acid reflux is esophageal cancer. About ten percent of patients with long-standing acid reflux develop changes in the swallowing tube that increase the risk of developing adenocarcinoma, a deadly cancer with a 5-year survival rate of less than fifteen percent. The condition is called "Barrett's esophagus. "Fortunately, only about one in 200 patients with Barrett's esophagus develops cancer each year. And over the last year a treatment called radiofrequency ablation has been found to be extremely effective in treating Barrett's esophagus that is starting to show signs that it…

The Poisonous Mutation

He mistakenly ingested a large amount of boric acid as a single oral dose to stop hiccups. On admission, he had vomiting, diarrhea, and hiccups. Laboratory data was diagnostic of acute renal failure. Hemodialysis and charcoal hemoperfusion were performed in series. The serum concentration of boric acid was reduced by the therapy, but the patient died due to cardiac insufficiency. Acute boric acid poisoning resulting from a single oral dose in adults has rarely been reported. Our case is the fourth fatal case in adults since the last few years following a single, acute ingestion of boric acid. Being corrosive and pungent, it is rarely consumed accidently. It is mostly used as a suicidal modality. It has been however, rarely used with homicidal intent too. The high degree of absorption of boric acid from broken skin surfaces and mucous membranes is emphasized. Absorption of boric acid through intact adult skin could not be demonstrated.

Its comutagenic effects may be explained by interfe…

Wife of Othniel, Achsah

She was the only girl in the family, and had three brothers. She became the wife of Othniel, son of Kenaz, Caleb’s younger brother. Othniel became one of Israel’s judges and had, through the Spirit of God, the noble faith of his race. The story of Achsah is told in charming and picturesque detail in the above Scripture. Her father promised her in marriage to the gallant man who was able to capture Debir, or Keriath-sepher which means, “The City of the Book.” The feat was accomplished by Othniel, and Caleb gave to his daughter, as a dowry, a portion of the south land. Not satisfied, she wanted springs of water to irrigate her fields, so Caleb gave her the upper springs and the nether springs. Although, as a Jewess, Achsah looked for great things through faith in God’s promise of the land, her request for an addition to the generous dowry already bestowed, reveals an element of covetousness in her disposition. W. Mackintosh Mackay in his character-study of Achsah speaks of her as “The D…

Folklore of Achroite Gems

Mineralogists gave tourmaline a variety of names, such as elbaite, tsilaisite, dravite, chromdravite, liddicoatite, uvite, schorl, achroite, buergerite, feruvite, foitite, povondraite and rubellite. Tourmaline occurs in every color of the rainbow and also in combinations of two or three colors. Sometimes the colors are at different ends of the crystal, while other times one color is in the heart of the crystal and another on the outside. When the later combination displays a pink center with a green rind it is called "watermelon tourmaline". The ability of this stone to look like other gemstones led to some confusions.

Many gemstones in the Russian Crown jewels from the 17th Century once thought to be rubies are in fact tourmalines. In South America, where the majority of such gem-quality material is found, green tourmaline is still referred to as the "Brazilian emerald". The quantity of such green stones which were mined in the early days of the Portuguese coloniza…

The Father of Achondrogenesis

Achondrogenesis refers to a diverse group of generally lethal chondrodysplasias characterized by a short trunk, severe micromelia, and a disproportionately large cranium. Achondrogenesis is the second most common lethal short-limb dysplasia. The term achondrogenesis is actually a misnomer, as it implies that cartilage is not made. In this condition, cartilage is made but it is profoundly abnormal. Affected infants had a short trunk, extreme micromelia, and a disproportionately large cranium. Radio-graphically, they were demonstrated as having deficient spine ossification, short ribs with cupped and flared ends, and absent pubic and ischial ossification.The genetic condition is characterised by abnormalities in the skeletal system. There are chances that you would have a child with this disorder if both you and your partner carry this gene. Infants born with the condition are unable to breathe properly, and may not live without intensive medical support. That's how John had to live…